Song Sparrows – Sub Song

I got this information from the Bird Note website…

Young male Song Sparrows learn about 10 songs from adult tutors – sometimes from their fathers, but not always. And they learn in stages: 1) “subsong,” when the birds babble in a quiet and unstructured way; 2) the “plastic” stage, which contains recognizable adult syllables but is still wobbly, uncertain; and 3) the “crystallized” song, with notes that are well formed and repeated with little variation. 

At Lake St. Clair Metropark I was fooled by a song that I did not know… Knowing Bird Songs is one of my strongest skills when birding… It has served me well and I spend a good amount of time listening and fine tuning those skills…. Birds have many different songs and dialects and I am fascinated by the fact that the same species can have variable types of songs based upon where they were born and raised… So when I hear a song that I do not recognize, I am quite intrigued… I made my way to a green clump of vegatation bording the beach and notice a sparrow like bird in the clump singing this garbled, multiple note song, and realize that its a Song Sparrow singing some weird song…. I recorded some video with my 7D and posted it on facebook…. first asking those on the Southeastern Birding page to identify my juvenile bird… almost everyone got it right… then I added the video and said, listen….   I was informed by Andy Dettling and Mike Mencotti that it takes a while for the males to learn to sing… so I looked up the information above….. Give a listen to this “Sub Song” of the Song Sparrow…. (He starts singing right after the Least Sandpiper in the background pipes down)

 

Its been awhile…

I have been so busy with work the last few weeks that I have barely had time to bird…. However, I got out a few times this week for short periods of time before and after work… Shorebirds are beginning to move and the reports coming out of Point Mouillee have gotten me checking out LSCMP beach…. I have only seen some Least and Semipalmated Sandpipers, Semipalmated Plover and Spotted Sandpipers there.  The wetland conservation area behind Partridge Creek Mall in Clinton Twp has been very good….  After the report from Ed Lewandowski on the net, I headed there a couple days ago and there were half dozen Lesser Yellowlegs, 8 Pectoral Sanpipers, Solitary, Least and Semipalmated Sandpipers and one Semipalmated Plover….

Migrant songbirds are beginning to move and I had Chestnut-sided, Nashville, Black and White and Tennessee Warblers today… I tagged along with Tom Heatley and  Joanna Pease and family today walking the trails today at LSCMP…  In addition to the warblers, there were plenty of Green Heron, a Virginia Rail, half dozen Ruby-throated Hummingbirds and a Coopers Hawk….. We also found a Monarch Butterfly with a tag on it…. Evidently one of the naturalists has been raising them and tagging them…. very cool…..

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Green Heron

Green Heron

Monarch

Monarch

 

Lesser Yellowlegs

Lesser Yellowlegs

Pectoral Sandpipers

Pectoral Sandpipers

Pectoral Sandpiper

Pectoral Sandpiper

Solitary Sandpiper

Solitary Sandpiper

 

No time to bird this weekend…

Busy Weekend… Had a wedding to go too and today I spent working in the yard… I did stop by Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge on the way home from work on Thursday, but the water level was high and there was not much too see…. I took a decent photo of a Belted Kingfisher…. not very close but I normally dont get real close to them to photograph them… they are my nemesis bird as far as pics go… With the new construction going on behind my home, there are not many butterflies around… my garden is almost void of them… I did manage to photograph one Red Admiral….

Belted Kingfisher

Belted Kingfisher

 

Red Admiral

LSCMP at dawn….

I stopped at Lake St. Clair Metropark today right at dawn as a storm was moving thru…. as soon as the rain stopped I made my way to the beach… there was a family of Purple Martins sitting on the wires near the park office. The young ones still begging for food from the adults… Not much to see on the beach… there were a half dozen least sandpipers, one nice looking Semipalmated Sandpiper, a Lesser Yellowlegs, 6 Spotted Sanpipers in winter plumage and one Sanderling, that was shy and would not allow me to get very close….

Least Sandpiper

Least Sandpiper

Purple Martin

Purple Martin

Purple Martin

Purple Martin

Sanderling

Semipalmated Sandpiper

Semipalmated Sandpiper

Semipalmated Sandpiper

Semipalmated Sandpiper

Semipalmated Sandpiper

Semipalmated Sandpiper

Shiawassee on the way home….

I stopped by Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge on the way home from work…. there were a ton of shorebirds at mile marker 2.5 on the Auto Tour, but most of them were in scope range only… peeps galore, Lesser and Greater Yellowlegs, one Short-billed Dowitcher, one probable Red Knot (way, way out there) and a few others I could not identify without a good scope… The Dickcissels are still present near the parking lot at the beginning of the Auto Tour… they were singing in the fields behind the marsh/pond… I saw a flock of birds in the distance that kept taking flight and circling around… I finally put on the boots and made my way out there into the field to find a flock of about 60 Bobolinks… There were females, males in winter plumage and males that were changing… interesting looking flock… they were very approachable…

Bobolink

Bobolink

Bobolink

Bobolink

Bobolink

Bobolink

Bobolink

Bobolink

Bobolink

Bobolink

Bobolinks

Bobolinks

 

White-tailed Deer Fawn

White-tailed Deer Fawn

Great Egret

Great Egret

Great Egret

Great Egret

Pied-billed Grebe

Pied-billed Grebe